How To Social Media

“We don’t have a choice on whether we do social media, the question is how well we do it” -Erik Qualman

Posting to social media from your website means that your charity gets to keep the counts (likes, shares, retweets), drive traffic back to your website and earn credibility as an information source.

It’s not frequency that counts, it’s the brevity of your content. Keep them short, interesting/informative and newsworthy. Most of your posts should give people ‘new news’ or insights into your event or the charity itself. Donors, and volunteers want to hear more about their favourite charities not endless requests for support. Give your audience more about you; tell them about your volunteers, facts about your organization or insights from other departments. And do most of it from your website so you can enjoy what’s working, adjust what’s not and measure engagement in a meaningful way.

How To Social

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Not Just Another Brick In The Wall: Ledbury Park SAC Honours Helkio Design

IMG_1978The LPSAC logo mimics the complexity of Ledbury Park students while giving a nod to the building’s architecture. Ledbury Park School Advisory Council adopted a new before launching their hugely successful capitol campaign a little over two years ago.

Their Believe Campaign has raised over $28,000 and funds resources such as SMART Boards, athletic uniforms, literacy and numeracy resources plus the Brick by Brick fundraising campaign which bridged the gap between the TDSB’s commitment ($75K) and the full project budget for ($150K) Ledbury’s new Playscape. Graphic Design: Raymond Helkio

 

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The Silencing of Dissent: Harper’s Clampdown on Free Speech

Untitled-1There continues to be a nationwide crackdown on charities who participate in political activism yet there has been virtually no public outcry. It’s not for lack of interest as much as there a lot fewer organizations that are able say something about it.

Charitable organizations have been restricted from spending more than ten percent of their resources on political activities and while this prohibition on charities has been on the books since 1985, it’s only been in recent years that we’ve seen the Harper government use it as a weapon (think: gag order) against charities. It’s not just random charities either, our government takes particular offence to environmental agencies (read: oil), development groups (read: poverty), human rights organizations and charities who receive donations from labour unions. Seem suspicious at all?

With the charities who are closest to the issues now ball-gagged, the government is free to do what it wants without the dissent. Just this month The Kitchener-Waterloo Field Naturalists (TKWFN) – who publicly defend the Endangered Species Act – were flagged by tax auditors about their political activity and warned that they could be in for a tax audit which for a charitable organization is devastating at best. It’s worth noting that TKWFN has an operating budget of about $16K which hardly seems worth all the feathers they are ruffling. It’s no coincidence that this news was delivered to TKWFN days after the environment minister responded to their complaint over government approved chemicals destroying bee colonies.

Other charities who are currently under scrutiny include Pen Canada, Tides Canada, David Suzuki Foundation, Ecology Action Centre, Canada Without Poverty, United Church of Canada and the Canadian Centre for Policy alternatives. And this list will continue to grow. Even more horrifying is that many of these audits resulted from complaints lodged by oil company lobbyists about the charities’ political activity (read: corporations having bareback sex with our government).

Not unlike the gag order placed over Canadian scientists, the Harper government is keeping the public in the dark by keeping charities silent on issues that conflict with their interests. It’s important that our charitable organizations are allowed to manage themselves, as they see fit, not how an oil company, pharmaceutical giant or government thinks it should be done. A government should govern the nation and not get involved in the day-to-day operations of how our organizations spend their resources.

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Project Seahorse: Annual Report

Seahourse Annual Report 2013

Dr. Amanda Vincent: “The world needs more people committed to marine conservation. In an era marked by the exponential decline of coral reefs and other ecosystems, this is one of the foremost challenges we face, one that Project Seahorse is always trying to address through our work. The question is, how do you do it? How do you turn people into stewards of the marine environment?” Annual Report, Graphic Design: Raymond Helkio

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